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Program

The preliminary program is available now!

Opening Ceremony of BMT 2018

September 26, 2018 – 18:15 – 19:45

Board of Chairs

18:15 – 18:30 - Greetings of the Board of Directors

Board of Chairs

Prof. Dr. Hermann Requardt (1)

18:30 -19:00 - Official Speech - Biomedizinische Technik in Zeiten der Paradigmenwechsel

Prof. Dr. Hermann Requardt

Vizepräsident der Deutschen Akademie der Technikwissenschaften (Acatech)

Prof. Dr. Hermann Requardt (1)

Prof. Dr. Hermann Requardt

Vizepräsident der Deutschen Akademie der Technikwissenschaften (Acatech)

Abstract

“Although healthcare industry enjoys resilient growth patterns over the past decades, their customer basis is challenged by a variety of questions. While traditional markets ask for more health per invested dollar, emerging healthcare systems suffer from scarcity of specialists and infrastructure. Furthermore, new competition arises from adjacent fields: Consumer electronics discovers medical electronics as an attractive niche, and IT industry identified medical procedures as a data business. The boundaries between historically detached industries like pharma and devices have shifted or been eliminated while a new customer group has gained momentum and influence: The patients. Aging societies realize that healthcare is more than philanthropy: It becomes an invest into the economic basis of national economies. Science and technology are key elements of the solution of these challenges; however, not always along traditional paths of scientists and technologists.”



Biography

„Hermann Requardt works as an independent advisor, consultant and investor. He achieved his degrees in physics and philosophy at the University of Frankfurt and started his career at the DLR where he submitted his PhD thesis in radiation biophysics. He joined Siemens in 1984 in the R&D department of MRI and worked in a variety of positions including CTO and CEO Healthcare. Today, Hermann Requardt works as board member in a variety of technically oriented companies and acts as vice president “life sciences” within the “National Academy of Science and Engineering (acatech)”. He is an honorary professor of physics at the University of Frankfurt.

Prof. Dr.-Ing. K.-P. Schmitz - picture

19:00 – 19:15 - DGBMT Fellow

Prof. Dr.-Ing. K.-P. Schmitz - Institutsdirektor

Institut für ImplantatTechnologie und Biomaterialien e.V. (IIB e.V.)

Kompetenzzentrum für Medizintechnik Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

Prof. Dr.-Ing. K.-P. Schmitz - picture

Prof. Dr.-Ing. K.-P. Schmitz - Institutsdirektor

Institut für ImplantatTechnologie und Biomaterialien e.V. (IIB e.V.)

Kompetenzzentrum für Medizintechnik Mecklenburg-Vorpommern

Schmitz, Klaus-Peter, Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil., 16.01.1946

Universität Rostock, Institut für Biomedizinische Technik (IBMT)

Friedrich-Barnewitz-Str. 4, 18119 Rostock, Deutschland

Telefon: +49 381 54345-600

Fax:        +49 381 54345-602

E-Mail:    klaus-peter.schmitz@uni-rostock.de

Akademische Ausbildung mit Abschluss

1964-1969       Angewandte Mechanik, Universität Rostock, Dipl.-Ing.

1968-1972       Forschungsstudium, Universität Rostock

Wissenschaftliche Abschlüsse

1972                Promotion: Technische Mechanik, Universität Rostock, Dr.-Ing.

1980                Habilitation: Technische Mechanik, Universität Rostock

 Beruflicher Werdegang ab Studienabschluss

1972-1984       Entwicklungsingenieur der Schiffbauindustrie, Institut für Schiffbau, Rostock

1984-1990       Bereichsleiter/WB-Leiter „Assistierte Zirkulation und Künstliches Herz“, Klinik für Innere Medizin der Universität Rostock

1990-1992       Leiter der Abteilung „Biomechanik und Medizinische Werkstoffe“, Zentrum für Bioengineering, Klinik für Innere Medizin der Universität Rostock

1992                Professur für Biomedizinische Technik an der Universität Rostock          

1992-1995       Abteilungsleiter Biomedizinische Technik, Institut für Biomedizinische Technik und Medizinische Informatik, Medizinische Fakultät, Universität Rostock

1995-2014       Institutsdirektor des Instituts für Biomedizinische Technik, Medizinische Fakultät, Universität Rostock

Seit 1996         Vorsitzender des Vorstands und Institutsdirektor des Instituts für Implantattechnologie und Biomaterialien e.V. (An-Institut der Universität Rostock)

 Sonstiges

Preise und Auszeichnungen

  • VDE-Ehrenring „Biomedizinische Technik“ 2008

 Mitglied in folgenden Gesellschaften

  • Mitglied der Technikwissenschaftlichen Klasse der Berlin-Brandenburgischen Akademie der Wissenschaften
  • Gründungsmitglied der acatech – Deutsche Akademie der Technikwissenschaften
  • Vorstandsvorsitzender des Forschungszentrums für Biomedizintechnik an der Universität Rostock
  • Vorsitzender des Vorstands des BMBF-Verbundprojekts REMEDIS – Höhere Lebensqualität durch neuartige Mikroimplantate (Spitzenforschung und Innovation in den Neuen Bundesländern)
  • Vorsitzender des Vorstands im BMBF-Projekt RESPONSE – Partnerschaft für Innovation in der Implantattechnologie im Rahmen der Initiative Zwanzig20 – Partnerschaft für Innovation.
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Dr.-lng. Christian Johannes Roth - picture

19:15 – 19:25 - Award of the Klee-Price of the DGBMT

Dr.-lng. Christian Johannes Roth

Dr.-lng. Christian Johannes Roth - picture

Dr.-lng. Christian Johannes Roth

Dr. med. Marie-Luise Metasch - picture

19:25 – 19:35 - Award of “Patientensicherheit in der Medizintechnik” Price

Dr. med. Marie-Luise Metasch

Dr. med. Marie-Luise Metasch - picture

Dr. med. Marie-Luise Metasch

Get Together

19:35 - Get Together

Exhibition Area - Foyer C.A.R.L.

Get Together

Exhibition Area - Foyer C.A.R.L.

Keynotes of BMT 2018

Fergal J. O’Brien

Prof. Fergal J. O'Brien, Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin, Ireland

"Scaffold-based delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics for enhanced tissue repair"

26. Sept. 2018, 10:10-10:40

Fergal J. O’Brien

"Scaffold-based delivery of nucleic acid therapeutics for enhanced tissue repair"

26. Sept. 2018, 10:10-10:40

Abstract

Recent advances in tissue engineering have made progress towards the development of biomaterials with a capacity to deliver growth factors in order to promote enhanced tissue repair. However, controlling the release of these growth factors on demand and within the desired localized area for repair is a major challenge and the high costs and side effects associated with uncontrolled delivery has proved increasingly problematic in clinical applications. Gene therapy might be a valuable tool to avoid the limitations of local delivery of growth factors. While non-viral vectors are typically inefficient at transfecting cells, our group has had significant success in this area using a scaffold-mediated gene therapy approach for regenerative applications. These gene activated scaffold platforms not only act as a template for cell infiltration and tissue formation, but also as a ‘factory’ to provoke autologous host cells to take up specific genes and then engineer therapeutic proteins in a sustained but eventually transient fashion. Alternatively, the scaffold-mediated delivery of siRNAs and miRNAs can be used to silence specific genes associated with pathological states.  This presentation will provide an overview of ongoing research in our lab in this area with a particular focus on gene-activated biomaterials for promoting stable cartilage formation in joint repair and on the scaffold-based delivery of therapeutics for enhancing vascularization in bone repair and wound healing.

Biography

Prof. Fergal J. O'Brien is Chair of Bioengineering & Regenerative Medicine and Head of the Tissue Engineering Research Group in RCSI and PI & Deputy Director of the Advanced Materials and Bioengineering Research (AMBER Centre). He is a leading innovator in the development of advanced biomaterials for regenerative medicine. He is a member of the World Council of Biomechanics and has previously served as Biomaterials Topic Chair for the Orthopaedic Research Society and as an EU Council Member of TERMIS. His research focuses on the development and clinical translation of scaffold-based therapeutics for tissue engineering, with a major focus on functionalizing these scaffolds as systems to deliver biomedicines and as advanced 3D pathophysiology in vitro systems for drug development, studying cellular crosstalk and understanding disease states in cancer, angiogenesis, immunology and infection. He has published almost 200 journal articles, numerous book chapters & editorials in peer-reviewed international journals & books, filed 13 patents/disclosures and supervised over 35 doctoral students to completion. He has presented over 100 invited talks and has a current h-index of 58 (Feb, 2018).

Thomas Neumuth (1)

Prof. Thomas Neumuth, Medical Faculty of the University of Leipzig and the Faculty of Electrical Engineering of the University of Applied Sciences Leipzig, Germany

"Patient Specific Model Guided Therapy"

26. Sept. 2018, 15:20-15:50

Thomas Neumuth (1)

"Patient Specific Model Guided Therapy"

26. Sept. 2018, 15:20-15:50

Abstract

Modern medicine is no longer conceivable without the use of technology. Medicine, information management, and technology converge to an ever greater extent. This development requires a combination of classic medical devices with modern information systems. Model-based therapy enables a patient-specific diagnosis and therapy selection, application and management. This approach can increase therapeutic efficacy, treatment precision, and treatment speed. Current systems examples are "smart" biomedical systems that adapt to patient-specific parameters, robotic systems for dynamic (re-)positioning of effectors, or decision support systems. The talk introduces the topic of model-guided therapy and presents current smart patient-specific biomedical technology.

Biography

Thomas Neumuth engineer and computer scientist. He is a professor of biomedical information systems and works at the Medical Faculty of the University of Leipzig and the Faculty of Electrical Engineering of the University of Applied Sciences Leipzig.
Neumuth is head of the research group Model-based Automation and Integration and is deputy executive director of the BMBF-Center for Computer-Assisted Surgery (ICCAS). His research focuses on applied research and development in the area of intelligent and situation-adaptive medical technology.
He is chairman for science of the medical device interoperability association OR.NET e.V. (ornet.org). In addition to his work in the field of intelligent operating theatres, he is currently developing a mobile emergency hospital for disaster response on behalf of the European Commission for Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid.
His research work in the field of medical data integration has been honored, among other things, with the Innovation Prize IT 2014 and the election as German Chancellery Expo at the 2017 Digital Summit. He is co-founder and coach of several companies in the field of medical technology.

Micheal Tanter

Prof. Mickael Tanter, Wave Physics for Medicine Institut Langevin, CNRS, INSERM, ESPCI Paris, France

"Breaking the fundamental barriers of Ultrasound for Functional Ultrasound NeuroImaging"

27. Sept. 2018, 10:10-10:40

Micheal Tanter

"Breaking the fundamental barriers of Ultrasound for Functional Ultrasound NeuroImaging"

27. Sept. 2018, 10:10-10:40

Abstract

In the last fifteen years, the introduction of plane or diverging wave transmissions rather than line by line scanning focused beams broke the resolution limits of ultrasound imaging. By using such large field of view transmissions, the frame rate reaches the theoretical limit of physics dictated by the ultrasound speed and an ultrasonic map can be provided typically in tens of micro-seconds (several thousands of frames per second). Interestingly, this leap in frame rate is not only a technological breakthrough but it permits the advent of completely new ultrasound imaging modes, including shear wave elastography1-2, electromechanical wave imaging, ultrafast Doppler, ultrafast contrast imaging, and even functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity (fUltrasound) introducing Ultrasound as an emerging full-fledged neuroimaging modality.

At ultrafast frame rates, it becomes possible to track in real time the transient vibrations – known as shear waves – propagating through organs. Such "human body seismology" provides quantitative maps of local tissue stiffness whose added value for diagnosis has been recently demonstrated in many fields of radiology (breast, prostate and liver cancer, cardiovascular imaging, ...).

For blood flow imaging, ultrafast Doppler permits high-precision characterization of complex vascular and cardiac flows. It also gives ultrasound the ability to detect very subtle blood flow in very small vessels. In the brain, such ultrasensitive Doppler paves the way for fUltrasound or fUS (functional ultrasound) imaging of brain activity with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution compared to fMRI. It provides the first modality for imaging of the whole brain activity working on awake and freely moving animals with unprecedented resolutions 3-5 and was also translated recently to clinics6.

Finally, we recently demonstrated that it can be combined with 3 µm diameter microbubbles injections in order to provide a first in vivo and non-invasive imaging modality at microscopic scales deep into organs combined with contrast agents by localizing the position of millions of microbubbles at ultrafast frame rates.

This ultrasound localization microscopy technique solves for the first time the problem of in vivo imaging at microscopic scale the whole brain vasculature 7. Beyond fundamental neuroscience or stroke diagnosis, it will certainly provide new insights in the understanding of tumor angiogenesis, for example combined with PET/CT imaging8.

  1. M. Tanter and M. Fink, Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound, IEEE UFFC, 61(1), pp. 102-119, 2014
  2. M.E. Fernandez-Sanchez et al, Nature, July 2015
  3. Mace et al., Nature Methods, Jun. 2011
  4. Osmanski et al, Nature Comm., Oct. 2014
  5. L.A. Sieu et al, Nature Methods, Jul. 2015
  6. Demene et al, Science Translational Medicine, 2017
  7. C.Errico et al, Nature, Dec. 2015
  8. Provost et al, Nature Biomedical Engineering, Feb. 2018

For more informations:
http://www.fultrasound.eu/

www.iconeus.com

https://www.institut-langevin.espci.fr/wave_physics_for_medicine_inserm_u979?lang=en


Biography

Research Professor of the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research, Institut Langevin, ESPCI, Paris France

Mickael Tanter is a research professor of the French National Institute for Health and Medical Research (Inserm) and distinguished professor of ESPCI Paris. He is heading the laboratory “Physics for Medicine” and deputy director of Langevin Institute (CNRS) at ESPCI, Paris, France. He is also the director of the first INSERM Technology Research Accelerator created in 2016 and dedicated to Biomedical Ultrasound. Mickael Tanter is a world-renowned expert in biomedical ultrasound and wave physics. He authored more than 300 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters and is the recipient of 45 international patents. In the last 20 years, he co-invented several major innovations in Biomedical Ultrasound: Transient Elastography, Ultrafast Ultrasound and Shear Wave Elastography, functional Ultrasound (fUS) imaging of brain activity and Superresolution Ultrasound based on Ultrasound Localization Microscopy. He received many national and international distinctions (among them the Honored Lecture of the Radiology Society of North America in 2012, the Grand Prize of Medicine and Medical Research of Paris city in 2011, the Grand Prize of Fondation de la Recherche Médicale in 2016 and the Carl Hellmuth Hertz Prize of IEEE Ultrasonics, Ferroelectrics and Frequency Control society in 2017, and recently the highest distinction of the European Society in Molecular Imaging ESMI). M. Tanter is also the co-founder of several MedTech companies in Biomedical Ultrasound (Supersonic Imagine, CardiaWave, Iconeus).


Hans R. Figulla (1)

Prof. Dr. med. Hans-Reiner Figulla, Medical Director Emeritus, University Jena, Germany

"The Development of Cardiac Implants: A Long Bumpy Road: But Great Chances at the End"

27. Sept. 2018, 15:20-15:50

Hans R. Figulla (1)

"The Development of Cardiac Implants: A Long Bumpy Road: But Great Chances at the End"

27. Sept. 2018, 15:20-15:50

Abstract

The human heart is a rather simple organ, therefore offers great treatment opportunities, but also has inherent risks:

  • Mechanical implants will improve its performance once its failing 
  • Miniaturized implants can be deployed via blood vessels minimal invasively
  • The requirements for functional precise and durable performance are high, because device failure has catastrophic consequences

To be successful we therefore need:

  • a perfect understanding of the dysfunctional heart and its requirements

  • minimized implants for the deployment with catheters

  • extensive testing and regulatory hurdles to prevent malfunction

A sensitive balance between clinical needs, technical possibilities and regulatory hurdles is essential for the successful evolution of cardiac devices.

This balance as to be fine-tuned nationally in a global word, to compete with other nations.


Biography

Scientific Career
Since 2015:
Director emeritus of the Department for Cardiology, Friedrich- Schiller-University Jena, Germany
Medical Consulting in Interventional Cardiology www.figulla.org
1997 – 2015:
Elected Full Professor and Director of the Department for Cardiology, Friedrich- Schiller-University Jena, Germany
1988:
Associate Professor of the Department of Cardiology, University Hospital Göttingen, Germany
"Habilitation" and Faculty Member of the University Hospital Göttingen, Germany

Honours and Awards
2008 : BMBF – Nomination for the German Future Award 2008

Industrial Experience
2006: Co-founder of Occlutech GmbH (Cardiac Occluders)
2006: Co-founder of Jena Valve Technology GmbH (percutaneous heart valves)
2018: Co-founder of DEVie.tech UG (drug eluting valve)
Patents: approx. 210 patents in the field of interventional cardiology
Literature more than 500 papers (according to PubMed), 2 books, 28 book chapters

Micheal Tanter

Stefan Schlichting, Dräger, Lübeck, Germany

„An architecture for distributed systems of medical devices in high acuity environments”

28. Sept. 2018, 10:10-10:40

Micheal Tanter

„An architecture for distributed systems of medical devices in high acuity environments”

28. Sept. 2018, 10:10-10:40

Abstract

In this talk an architecture for distributed systems of medical devices in high acuity environments is introduced. The architecture is built on the principles of a clinical workplace service-oriented medical device architecture (SOMDA) and is a current development project in the IEEE 11073 work group. After describing interoperability challenges, the OR.net consortium, and the current standards landscape the architecture is presented. This architecture is now being standardized in the IEEE standard series together with the Medical Devices Profile for Web Services (MDPWS) and the Basic Integrated Clinical Environment Protocol Specification (BICEPS). This presentation gives a detailed inside into the mechanisms defined in the standards and how they can be used to implement a distributed systems of medical devices in high acuity environments.

Biography

Stefan Schlichting hat im Jahr 2005 sein Informatikstudium (Nebenfach:  Medizinische Informatik) abgeschlossen und danach zunächst als IT-Consultant gearbeitet. Im Jahr 2006 ist er als wissenschaftlicher Mitarbeiter an die Klinik für Chirurgie des Universitätsklinikums Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, gewechselt und hat dort im Bereich der computerunterstützten Leberchirurgie geforscht. Im Jahr 2009 hat er in dieser Thematik an der Universität zu Lübeck promoviert. Zurzeit arbeitet er als System Architect bei der Dräger Medical Systems, Inc.

und ist unter anderem für das Thema Interoperabilität von Medizinprodukten zuständig. In diesem Zusammenhang vertritt er Dräger in verschiedensten nationalen und internationalen Normungsorganisationen.